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The Best Weekly Markets in Tel Aviv

Wochenmarkt Tel Aviv

Tomorrow is market day. On Fridays, the markets in Tel Aviv are overcrowded. Although I’m no fan of crowds, I love the Friday markets with their unique flair. Housewives and hipsters, retirees and foodies meet there to fill up the fridge for the weekend. Buying and bartering as if they all had families of ten. Here are my favorite markets.

Shuk HaNamal with sea view

wochemarkt tel aviv hanamal

My favorite, without a doubt. During the week, the market founded by food critic Michal Ansky, is rather laidback. Sportspeople drinking their juice, hobby chefs buying shiitake mushrooms or passers-by drinking an espresso. On Fridays, there’s farmers market outside the market hall. Farmers from all over the country arrive with their products. Whoever wants to buy the best challa (braided loaf) for Shabbat, has to get up early. The baked goods from the religious Bnei Brak stand are the absolute best and sell out quickly. Right next to it, you can eat hot, sweet corn on the cob and buy tomatoes in all colors and shapes. A stroll through Shuk HaNamal is worthwhile, with the added bonus of a sea breeze. It doesn’t get any better.

Shuk HaNamal, Hangar 12, Namal Tel Aviv

Sarona Market for Foodies

Wochenmarkt Tel Aviv Sarona

pic: Rafi Deloya

In the beautifully renovated Templer-district of Sarona, this food market can be found beneath the residential glass towers. Above the market, is the co-working space, Wework, where I wrote for a while. That’s why I know the Sarona Market inside out. Although it’s a very fancy market, I still like it. It’s the antipode to Shuk HaCarmel. I would come here to eat, not to shop. The fruit and vegetables are overpriced.

Wochenmarkt Tel Aviv Sarona

In the beautifully renovated Templer-district of Sarona, this food market can be found beneath the residential glass towers. Above the market, is the co-working space, Wework, where I wrote for a while. That’s why I know the Sarona Market inside out. Although it’s a very fancy market, I still like it. It’s the antipode to Shuk HaCarmel. I would come here to eat, not to shop. The fruit and vegetables are overpriced.

Sarona Market, 3 Kalman Magen Street, Tel Aviv

Newcomer Allenby-Rothschild

Wochenmarkt Tel Aviv Allenby

From the outside, one doesn’t see the market at first glance. The entrance from Rothschild Boulevard leads through a coffee house. I was here three times already, however the market hasn’t touched my heart yet. Architecturally, it reminds one of a small version of Sarona. For those who like drinking beer, there are 100 varieties to choose from. There are also spices, cheese, dim sum and fish and chips. The Men Tenten ramen bar is apparently superb, authentic Japanese, without adapting to the Israeli palate. I prefer to drink my coffee in the kiosks on Rothschild than in the new food-mecca.

Allenby Rothschild Market, Rothschild Boulevard 36, Tel Aviv

Shuk HaCarmel, the classic

Wochenmarkt Tel Aviv HaCarmel

To make it clear from the start, I love Shuk HaCarmel. It’s authentic, pure Tel Aviv. If you want to pay cheap prices and are looking for an oriental kick, you’re in the right place. It’s tight, especially Fridays. Centrally located on Allenby Road, the Shuk passes through the Yemeni neighborhood. My tip: explore the side streets with their spice bazaars and cafés. You’ll find simple restaurants there with the best ethnic cuisine in the city. 

There’s haggling and singing at HaCarmel, it’s loud and sticky. And it’s that which makes it. It’s the heart of Tel Aviv and you can really eat well here – at the Venezuelan Arepas stand, Libyan Burikas or street food for gourmets at HaShomer.  Let yourself drift away and follow the aromas.

Shuk HaCarmel Tel Aviv

Spices at Levinsky Market

Another favorite of mine. It’s actually not a market as you would imagine it in the typical sense. There are stores instead of stands. Nevertheless, it’s regarded as a market and has experienced a boom in recent years, as young operators have opened cool restaurants and cafés at the market. You can drink freshly roasted third wave coffee at Cafelix or home-brewed lemonade with flowers at hip Levinsky 43.

I normally start at Shuk HaNamal on Fridays, schlepp the fruit and vegetables home. Then I bike to Levinsky Market to meet with friends. When I’m hungry, I eat at Café Kaymaksuper mood, great vegan food. Right next to it is the vegan ice-cream parlor Gela. An ice-cream is never a bad idea before the well-deserved Friday siesta. Something which is sacred to me.

Levinsky Market, Levinsky Street Tel Aviv

What’s your favorite? Which of you is a market-goer? Write it in the comments…

Translation by Catherine Bradshaw

 

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